New Mexico: Health Secretary Balks At Medical Cannabis Expansion

Santa Fe: Health Secretary Lynn Gallagher has agreed to proposed changes in the state’s medical cannabis law that would permit patients with obstructive sleep apnea to access marijuana; but she rejected calls to expand access to patients with other debilitating conditions, including Tourette’s syndrome (TS) and opioid dependency.

“I cannot say with any degree of confidence that the use of cannabis for the treatment of opioid dependence and its symptoms would be either safe or effective,” Secretary Gallagher opined in a signed decision. She also rejected recommendations to permit the use of cannabis for the treatment of eczema, muscular dystrophy, psoriasis, or Tourette’s syndrome.

A number of case reports and clinical trials report that THC can mitigate symptoms of TS. Cannabis use has also been associated with improved outcomes in opioid-dependent subjects undergoing outpatient treatment. Among chronic pain patients enrolled in medical cannabis programs, the use of opioids typically is reduced or eliminated over time.

About Michael King Cannabis

Michael King is an experienced cannabis professional out of Palm Springs with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country.

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New Mexico: Health Secretary Balks At Medical Cannabis Expansion

Santa Fe: Health Secretary Lynn Gallagher has agreed to proposed changes in the state’s medical cannabis law that would permit patients with obstructive sleep apnea to access marijuana; but she rejected calls to expand access to patients with other debilitating conditions, including Tourette’s syndrome (TS) and opioid dependency.

“I cannot say with any degree of confidence that the use of cannabis for the treatment of opioid dependence and its symptoms would be either safe or effective,” Secretary Gallagher opined in a signed decision. She also rejected recommendations to permit the use of cannabis for the treatment of eczema, muscular dystrophy, psoriasis, or Tourette’s syndrome.

A number of case reports and clinical trials report that THC can mitigate symptoms of TS. Cannabis use has also been associated with improved outcomes in opioid-dependent subjects undergoing outpatient treatment. Among chronic pain patients enrolled in medical cannabis programs, the use of opioids typically is reduced or eliminated over time.

Original Press Release

 

About Michael King Cannabis

Michael King is an experienced cannabis professional out of Palm Springs with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country.

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Medical Marijuana Can Mean a Good Night’s Sleep - Michael King

For Veterans With PTSD, Medical Marijuana Can Mean a Good Night’s Sleep

Article Published by: leafly.com

Too many American veterans face a new enemy, encountered months or many years after leaving active duty: sleeplessness.

David Bass, a US Army officer who served for 20 years, describes how insomnia can begin for soldiers.

“In the combat zone,” Bass says, “sleeping is extremely difficult. You’re adrenalized all the time, under tremendous pressure all the time to accomplish the mission. So you’re operating on extreme lack of sleep. My experience in Iraq was that medical personnel gave us Ambien. I personally became addicted to Ambien so I could sleep. Some of my friends who were also officers were also using it when we were there.”

But Ambien-induced sleep is different from regular sleep. “[Ambien] has some side effects,” said Bass. (Ambien is notorious for these known side effects). “I’ve seen people sleepwalking. That’s not a good thing to do in a combat zone—doing things and having no memory of it.”

Stateside Problems

Even without those side effects, there’s still the problem of Ambien addiction once a soldier leaves the combat zone and return home. Soldiers who in the combat zone had Ambien-induced sleep – and had been readily supplied it by medical personnel there to ensure some means of getting rest — find their supply cut off, said Bass. Many turn to what’s available: unlimited quantities of alcohol. After deployment, “those of us dependent on Ambien used alcohol instead,” he said.

Even as he was dealing with his Ambien addiction, Bass recalls, he was also experiencing PTSD symptoms. “Paranoia and hypervigilance are two of the most common markers of PTSD,” he said. “I had nightmares. All these things lead to insomnia.”

According to the US Department of Veterans Affairs, “Insomnia is reported to occur in 90-100% of Vietnam-era Veterans with PTSD. Insomnia was also the most commonly reported PTSD symptom in a survey of Veterans from Afghanistan and Iraq.”

Sleep problems aren’t just a symptom of PTSD; they’re a hallmark of the disorder.

“One of the reasons [we’re] so adamantly working for medical marijuana was that we discovered it was the answer to insomnia,” Bass said, referring to himself and his veteran friends who were experiencing sleeplessness. “[We] were able to use it to have very peaceful and restful sleep. I realized I didn’t need Ambien and didn’t need to drink myself to sleep.”

Cannabis Can Require Trial and Error

Roger Martin, an Army veteran and the executive director of the advocacy organization, Grow for Vets, had experiences similar to Bass. Dealing with chronic pain and severe insomnia, Veterans Administration doctors prescribed him a cornucopia of drugs — including Ambien and opioids. After years of medicating with prescription drugs, he saw the writing on the wall. And, he knew it wouldn’t end well.

For Martin, who worked in law enforcement after he served, cannabis wasn’t a drug thought he’d ever consider. However, after doing research and at the suggestion of his doctor, he decided to give it a try. Martin’s initial foray into cannabis wasn’t exactly successful. Having never tried cannabis, he had no idea what to expect. Following advice from a budtender, he started with edibles. And, as he recounts:

“I had no idea how long to wait for edibles to take effect. I waited 20 minutes, nothing happened. So I took some more. Another 20 minutes, still nothing. I took some more. Than pow! It all hit at once, and I didn’t know what hit me.”

Martin, who shares his story in the most recent installment of Eyes Wide Open: A Podcast About Cannabis and Insomnia, says despite his miscalculation, he was so determined to get off of prescription drugs, he tried cannabis a couple of more times before getting it right.

Now, he says — his moderate dose of 10 to 15 mgs — works great. But, he urges others to heed his advice. “Start low, and go slow.”


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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Study Cannabinoid May Help Relieve Migraines Michael King

Study: Cannabinoid May Help Relieve Migraines

Article Published by: medicaljane.com

Researchers Investigated Migraines and Cannabinoids

A team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco recently published a study in The Journal of Neurosciencecentered around the endocannabinoid system and its role in the treatment of migraine headaches. According to their findings, the activation of cannabinoid receptors in the brain may help modulate pain signals.

The research team was comprised of five Department of Neuorology members called the ‘Headache Group’. Knowing that cannabinoids have been tied to the perception of neuropathic pain, the researchers wanted to see if they would have similar success treating the throbbing nature of migraine headaches.

Endocannabinoids May Help Relieve Migraine Headaches
The Headache Group investigated the ‘periaqueductal’ gray matter, the part of the brain that modulates the descending nature of pain, in rats. In particular, they measured the activity of pain receptors and nerve fibers associated with headaches.

‘A delta fibers’ are nerves that respond to cold and pressure. According to the abstract of the Headache Group’s study, activation of the CB1 receptor reduced the amount of A delta fibers by as much as 19%, but there was no change in sensory information from skin on the face. This suggests that the pressure relief was the result of nervous system interactions

Another bit of proof for CB1-induced migraine relief was discovered when the Headache Group realized that the inhibition of the cannabinoid receptor prevented a decrease in pressure A delta fibers. As the researchers learned, the mechanism that underlies migraine headaches is quite complicated.

Triptans are a family of medicines used to temporarily relieve migraines that are thought to affect serotonin receptors. However, the Headache Group found that the underlying mechanism of migraine relief may involve an interaction between cannabinoid and serotonin receptors in certain areas of the brain. Due to this, the Headache Group believes the endocannabinoid system may be involved in triptan-related relief as well.


About Michael King Cannabis

Michael King is an experienced cannabis professional out of Palm Springs with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country.

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Study Cannabidiol CBD May Reduce Cigarette Consumption Michael King

Study: Cannabidiol (CBD) May Reduce Cigarette Consumption

Article Published by: medicaljane.com

Cannabidiol (CBD) Could Help Treat Nicotine Addiction

It is no secret that cigarette smoke has detrimental ramifications in the human body. In fact, a study published in 2008 cited tobacco as the single greatest cause of preventable death internationally.

Common conditions with which cigarettes are related include: heart attacks, strokes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and various types of cancer. In fact, each cigarette smoked is estimated to shorten life expectancy by 11 minutes.

By now, these statistics are commonplace in American society. Most, if not all, would agree that cigarettes are harmful to one’s health, but smoking cessation (quitting) can be troublesome for a number of reasons. A major cause of difficulty is the common occurrence of nicotine addiction. That being said, studies have suggested a link between nicotine addiction and the endocannabinoid system; the latest of which suggests that Cannabidiol (CBD) could be of assistance when trying to quit smoking.

UK Researchers Studied CBD and Cigarette Consumption
A team of researchers from University College London published a study in the September issue of the journal Addictive Behaviorsthat investigated whether low doses of cannabidiol (CBD) would help treat nicotine addiction in tobacco smokers who want to quit.

The research team, led by Celia J.A. Morgan, used a double-blind, placebo controlled model for their study, which consisted of 24 participants (12 male, 12 female) between the ages 18-35. In order to take place in the study, participants were required to smoke, on average, more that 10 cigarettes per day. That being said, they must also have expressed a desire to break the habit.

Participants were asked to record the amount of cigarettes they consumed during the week prior to treatment. After baseline testing, they were split into two groups. Each group was provided with an inhaler – One group received CBD and the other received a placebo. They were then instructed to use the inhaler whenever they felt the urge to smoke.

During the course of the treatment week, participants were asked to record their inhaler use and the number of cigarettes smoked in a journal. Additionally, participants were asked, via text message, to rate their current level of craving once per day.

Cannabidiol (CBD) May Help Decrease Cigarette Use

According to the study’s results, the group receiving cannabidiol (CBD) treatment experienced a significant reduction in the number of cigarettes smoked. The same cannot be said of the placebo group, as there was little-to-no change from pre- to post-treatment.

Interestingly, the decreased cigarette consumption occurred despite the fact that there was no change in the level of craving reported each day.

According to the research team, craving is often used to indicate the potential for relapse. Cannabidiol (CBD) was found to reduce cigarette consumption without causing craving levels to rise, which the researchers referred to as “a potentially encouraging finding.”

Of course, more research will be necessary to determine whether CBD is a viable treatment for nicotine addiction in a clinical setting. This study is limited in that it only included 24 participants. Furthermore the results relied on self-reporting and should be taken with a grain of salt. With that said, they suggest that cannabidiol (CBD) may be of benefit to those who want to quit smoking. According to the author of the study, “CBD may be effective in reducing cigarette use in tobacco smokers.”


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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Marijuana Can Help Children with Seizures, Cancer Nausea - Micha

Marijuana Can Help Children with Seizures, Cancer Nausea

Article Published by: healthline.com

Researchers said medical marijuana is effective in treating some conditions in children, but they urge caution on using the drug in young patients.

Should kids and adolescents ever use medical marijuana?

Administering the drug to younger patients remains somewhat contentious, but it also appears effective in treating a limited number of symptoms.

According to a new study published today in the journal Pediatrics, medical marijuana is effective in treating seizures and chemotherapy-induced nausea in young patients.

Researchers conducted a meta-analysis, looking at 22 relevant studies on the use of medical cannabis on children and adolescents to reach this conclusion.

Of the many chemical components found in marijuana, researchers determined that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the most abundant cannabinoid found in the plant, improved nausea and vomiting for young chemotherapy patients.

Cannabidiol (CBD) another cannabinoid present in marijuana was determined to have an effect on seizures.

Some advocates have hailed these results as further proof of the effectiveness of medical marijuana, particularly in cases where children haven’t responded to other traditional treatments.

“The real-world results of these programs indicate that cannabinoids can play a role in pediatric care, particularly in the treatment of life-threatening seizures, and that they can do so in a manner that is sometimes safer and more effective than conventional treatments,” Paul Armentano, deputy director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), told Healthline.

Treatment not effective in all cases

While treatment for the above conditions using medical marijuana seems promising, the review concludes there’s little evidence to support its effectiveness in treating a wide range of other conditions in young people.

Researchers wrote that they didn’t find sufficient support for the benefits of medical marijuana on neuropathic pain, posttraumatic stress disorder, or Tourette’s syndrome in young patients.

Other health organizations have previously issued warnings on the use of medical marijuana (and recreational marijuana) in children and adolescents due to the risks it represents.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) previously warned parents about these dangers, which they say include weakened motor skill control and memory function, as well as mental health issues, including depression.

“Our research supports the AAP’s concerns that cannabis can be harmful to children’s brains,” said Dr. Shane Shucheng Wong of Harvard’s department of psychiatry and a lead study author. “Studies of children and adolescents who use recreational cannabis, particularly frequent use of high potency cannabis over longer periods of time, suggest negative effects on learning, memory, attention, and problem-solving ability.”

As such, appropriate dosing of medical marijuana is of the utmost importance for younger patients.

Careful usage urged

Currently there are only two synthesized cannabinoids that are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as medications: dronabinol and nabilone.

Both are used to treat nausea and vomiting in children and adults.

AAP guidelines recognize the use of these two approved drugs in order to treat those conditions.

“The academy’s guidelines also recognizes cannabis may be an option for debilitating conditions, which includes seizures from epilepsy conditions,” said Wong.

The study authors warn that the use of the drugs in pediatric cases must be judicious because of the potential of psychoactive effects.

Naturally-derived cannabis — the actual components of the plant, including flowers and leaves — that are typically smoked or vaporized can have wildly varying chemical components and potency depending on the strain.

The same is true for marijuana concentrates and edible products.

The varying potency and chemical makeup of these products can make consistent, appropriate dosing more challenging in young patients.

To ensure oversight and appropriate usage, all states with medical marijuana programs require consent forms from a legal guardian and a physician to give kids access to medical marijuana.

Some states require the guardian to control dosage and frequency of use, but others do not.

As another safeguard, some states require two physicians to sign off on a minor using medical marijuana.


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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Israel leads the world in medical marijuana research - Michael K

How this tiny Middle Eastern nation came to lead the world in medical marijuana research

Article Published by: thecannabist.co

With its government’s approval, Israel has been a pioneer in medical cannabis research and development for more than 50 years

By Bruce Kennedy, The Cannabist Staff

Few people outside of the legal cannabis industry would associate Israel with marijuana. But the tiny nation, slightly larger in square miles than New Jersey, is a surprising world leader when it comes to pioneering medical cannabis research and development.

In the 1960s Israeli scientist Dr. Raphael Mechoulam, using confiscated Lebanese hashish he obtained from the police, was one of the first researchers to identify cannabidiol (CBD), one of the plant’s key compounds. And soon after he determined the structure of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the chemical compound that gives cannabis its intoxicating high.

Using his research as a springboard, Mechoulam convinced the country’s Ministry of Health to establish a medical cannabis program. In 1992, the ministry approved medical marijuana and eventually established a formal medical marijuana program that is currently being used by around 25,000 Israeli patients.

“Working in a small country certainly has its positive aspects,” Mechoulam, now an elder statesman in cannabis research, said in a 2012 interview with Israel21c. “It couldn’t have happened in the United States, because the laws were too strict. In Israel there’s a lot of shouting, but in the end you can make it.”

And while cannabis for non-medicinal use remains illegal in Israel, the nation’s liberal approach to cannabis studies has given it a substantial headstart over most countries when it comes to government approval for agricultural and clinical research.

Late last month Dr. Adi Eran, head of the pediatric neurology department at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, obtained government permits for the first-ever formal clinical trial of medicinal cannabis with autistic children and adults.

Another example: Tikun Olam is one of the largest medical cannabis companies in Israel and has been operating under a license from the Israeli government for nearly a decade. The private company claims to have one of the most extensive medical cannabis patient databases in the world. It has also initiated several research programs, including an ongoing survey on how cannabis affects children with cancer — and what it describes as “the world’s first randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study” of the effect of cannabis on patients with Crohn’s disease.

In comparison, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration recently refused to change marijuana’s classification as a Schedule I controlled substance, its most restrictive category. The DEA’s anticipated decision reiterated its position that cannabis has no currently accepted medical use and that the plant has a “high potential for abuse.”

There was one sign of change, however. In that same announcement, the DEA said it was reversing a decades-old policy and would make it easier for private companies and researchers to access new sources of marijuana — a move that some academics say could eventually lead to for-profit U.S. companies researching and producing their own cannabis and cannabinoid products.

According to the National Institutes of Health, there are currently around 350 clinical trials underway in the U.S. regarding cannabis. However, many of those trials are focused on cannabis withdrawal or treatment of cannabis dependency, rather than looking at the plant’s medicinal qualities and potential as a medical treatment.

For its part, the Food and Drug Administration says it recognizes and shares an interest in developing therapies from marijuana.

“We continue to encourage work to assess whether there are appropriate and effective therapeutic uses of marijuana and its components,” FDA spokesman Michael Felberbaum told The Cannabist via email, “and believe the drug approval process using scientifically valid and well-controlled clinical trials is the most appropriate way for this to occur.”

Cannabis advocates say Israel’s approach to funding cannabis research, and allowing that research to take place with the least possible political and legal fuss, should serve as an example to lawmakers in Washington and elsewhere.

“Unlike the U.S. government, the Israeli government has had few restrictions on doing research on cannabis, whether basic science or clinical studies,” said Dr. Alan Shackelford in a telephone interview with The Cannabist. He is a Harvard-trained physician and medical marijuana specialist based in Colorado.

Frustrated by federal restrictions on cannabis research in the United States, Shackelford relocated to Israel in 2014 to continue his studies there. However, he has since returned to the U.S. to seek funding for additional studies and to write protocols for them.

Nevertheless, he noted that Israel “is leading the world by instituting government policies that make it possible to conduct scientific investigations into the potential medical uses of cannabis with a minimum of restrictions and with sensible regulations, and by not putting roadblocks in the way of conducting legitimate research.”

In June the Israeli government announced it would establish guidelines for national regulations on using cannabis for medicine and research.

And in August the Health Ministry and Agriculture Ministry made a joint announcement — that current research efforts regarding cannabis will come under a new facility, the National Center for Research in Medical Cannabis, which is scheduled for completion in mid-2017.

The center will come under the operation of the Agriculture Ministry’s Volcani Center, which has a global reputation for its agriculture studies.

Nirit Bernstein is a senior research scientist at the Volcani Center, and her main area of research is environmental effects on plants. She has been studying cannabis for three years, especially how to optimize its cultivation practices, and said there is still “more unknown than known” about the plant’s biochemistry, physiology and medicinal impact.

“In addition to its much-talked-about main cannabinoids THC and CBD, it contains more than 100 other cannabinoids and over 300 additional secondary metabolites (i.e., components that appear in minute quantities),” she said in an e-mail interview with The Cannabist. “The magic in cannabis is in the profile (the content) of all these minuscule compounds.”

Funding for medical marijuana research is still scarce in both Israel and the United States. Israeli funding comes from the government as well as private and corporate sources, while U.S. funding is hard to find even in cannabis-friendly states. Colorado approved $9 million last year in medical marijuana research grants, while Washington state recently announced plans to sidestep federal regulations and create its own state marijuana research license.

One Colorado researcher even used crowdfunding earlier this year, to raise enough cash for his relatively low-budget study on how cannabis use influences motor function in multiple sclerosis patients.

These political and cultural obstacles have prompted some U.S. companies to use Israel as their R&D lab for cannabis products and technologies.

Reuters recently quoted iCan CEO Saul Kaye saying that U.S. firms have invested around $50 million over the past two years towards licensing Israeli medical marijuana patents, as well as agro-tech start-ups and cannabis delivery products such as inhalers. And that figure is expected to grow to $100 million in the coming year, according to Kaye, whose firm focuses on cannabis research efforts.

“The U.S. is currently the biggest market potential for our technology and, despite difficulties in regulation and in risk, the potential reward is huge,” said Eyal Barad, co-founder of Cannabics Pharmaceuticals, a Maryland-based company that conducts research on cannabis and cannabinoids at its Israeli subsidiary. This past March, Cannabics announced the start of clinical studies in Israel for cancer patients, using the company’s time-release capsules.

Speaking to The Cannabist by phone from Israel, Barad said legal cannabis companies in the U.S. should view their Israeli counterparts as potential partners, rather than business rivals.

“It’s a natural alliance, where a lot of the technologies are developed here (and) the market is in the U.S.,” he continued. “And it completely opens up to collaboration and cooperation; U.S. companies are backing up their products with clinical trials in Israel, which we can help facilitate.”

Israel’s government, meanwhile, has upped the ante on its commitment to cannabis. It recently announced plans to export Israeli-grown medical marijuana within the next several years. And while that decision is still tentative, Bernstein of the Volcani Center said there’s a lot of interest among Israeli farmers regarding the possibility of exporting a high-cash agricultural product like cannabis.

“Many excellent vegetable and flower growers would love to specialize in cultivating this unique crop,” she wrote. “These are … highly qualified, high-tech cultivation farmers (who) under combined efforts with the research sector in Israel can improve the product for the benefit and safety of the medical consumers.”


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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Cannabidiol May Prevent Alcohol-Induced Liver Damage - Michael King

Study: Cannabidiol (CBD) May Help Prevent Alcohol-Induced Liver Damage

Article Published by: medicaljane.com

It is no secret that alcohol consumption can negatively affect one’s liver. This is because it can cause an excess of fats and lipids and additional oxidative stress (i.e. damage caused by free radicals).

With that said, a recent study published in Free Radical Biology and Medicine offers an interesting preventive measure. Funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), it suggests that cannabidiol (CBD) could help protect the liver from alcohol-induced damage.

Researchers Prevent Alcohol-Induced Liver Damage With Cannabidiol (CBD)

As we know, cannabidol (CBD) may have anti-oxidant effects. Couple that with the constituent’s lack of psychoactivity, and it makes sense why the team of researchers from China and Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York chose to investigate its ability to counter alcohol-induced oxidative stress in the liver.

In doing so, they injected mice with ethanol twice a day for five days. This was intended to model the impact of binge drinking on one’s liver. Prior to this, a group of the mice were administered cannabidiol (CBD) as a preventive measure.

Sure enough, the study’s results showed that cannabidiol (CBD) may protect the liver from steatosis – the accumulation of fats and lipids. The researchers suggested that this was potentially the result of cannabidiol’s inhibition of oxidative stress and activation of pathways associated with fat accumulation.

The accumulation of fat in the liver can lead to much more serious problems like cirrhosis of the liver (i.e. scarring of the liver that may lead to liver failure) if it gets out of hand. With that said, there is no easy way to go about “curing” the disease once it occurs, so taking a preventive approach is best. Although increased research may strengthen the theory that cannabidiol (CBD) administration helps to prevent alcohol-induced liver damage, cannabidiol is not an approved or definitively effective preventive treatment at the present time. To reduce your risk of developing liver problems, the American Liver Foundation suggests that you eat a well-balanced diet, limit your alcohol intake, and practice safe sex.


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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Cayman Islands Make Medical Cannabis Introduction - Michael King

The Cayman Islands Make Ground-Breaking Medical Cannabis Introduction

Article Published by: medicaljane.com

In response to mounting evidence supporting the effective use of medical cannabis to treat chronic pain, seizures, and many other health problems, and in the face of case studies revealing life changing results for patients who incorporate cannabis into their healthcare plan, the Cayman Islands are making a ground-breaking medical cannabis introduction.

Medical Cannabis Introduced in Grand Cayman

Grand Cayman’s CTMH Doctors Hospital and Cayman Pharmacy Group have introduced medical cannabis for physician-selected patients who are residents in the Cayman Islands. During this initial phase, the primary focus is to engage and educate patients, and to track their progress.

“There will be follow-up phone calls from the pharmacists themselves to closely monitor each patient. The pharmacist will also provide feedback for the physicians and together they will work towards an individually tuned treatment plan,” the hospital stated. “Professional Pharmacy will consider prescriptions for cannabis oil from all licensed prescribers. Patients are encouraged to seek medical advice on this therapy directly from their physicians.”

As with all prescriptions in the country, Professional Pharmacy provides free and confidential patient counseling on prescriptions they dispense, and this same service will be offered for cannabis treatments.

Cannabis Oil Needs to be Imported

For the time-being, cannabis oil must be imported to the islands. According to a press release, CanniMed Therapeutics Inc. will export 12,960 ml of CanniMed® oils to Caribbean Medical Distributors Ltd., located in the Cayman Islands.

CanniMed Therapeutics is a Canadian-based, international plant biopharmaceutical company with 15 years of pharmaceutical cannabis cultivation experience. In addition, CanniMed has an active plant biotechnology research and product development program focused on the production of plant-based materials for pharmaceutical, agricultural, and environmental applications.

Caribbean Medical Distributors Ltd. is working with Professional Pharmacy Services Ltd., located in the CTMH Doctors Hospital (George Town, Cayman Islands) to dispense the cannabis oil.

Cannabis-based treatments are approved for use only in the Cayman Islands and the medicine cannot legally cross international borders. For example, patients cannot carry medical cannabis into other countries, even with a prescription.

Warren Takes Cannabis Debate in Cayman to the Next Level

Dennie Warren Jr. was instrumental in persuading the current administration to take a leap from some of the world’s most oppressive laws against the use of the cannabis plant to legalizing the use of extracts under prescription. Warren is now running for office in George Town West as an independent candidate, and one of his main political platforms focuses on the need for Cayman to “grow its own.”

Warren believes Cayman could better manage the quality and availability of cannabis if it was grown on the Island, rather than being restricted by the laws of exporter countries. Though the law in Cayman was changed last November and an import certificate for cannabis oil has been approved locally, issues around exporting it from the countries that grow cannabis complicates the process.


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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American Legion adopts resolution for medical marijuana - Michael King

American Legion adopts resolution supporting medical marijuana

Article Published by: stripes.com

RENO, Nev. – The American Legion adopted a resolution Thursday urging the federal government to allow Department of Veterans Affairs doctors to discuss and recommend medical marijuana in states where it’s legal, adding to the group’s efforts to get cannabis in the hands of veterans it could help.

The resolution, passed at the group’s national convention in Reno, Nevada, was authored by American Legion member Rob Ryan of Blue Ash, Ohio. According to the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Ohio has the fourth highest rate of overdose deaths in the nation, behind West Virginia, New Hampshire and Kentucky. It’s also one of the 29 states that permit some form of cannabis use. Ryan said he’s heard from veterans “over and over and over again” who use marijuana as an alternative to addictive opioids.

“Our state congressmen, when the American Legion says something, they listen. Hopefully, this will have the same impact at the federal level,” Ryan said. “People should not be afraid to go to their doctors and talk honestly.”

Ryan shepherded the resolution through his local American Legion post, and then took it to the county, district and state level before it was discussed in Reno this week. Sue Sisley, a psychiatrist studying marijuana’s effects on veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder, called it a “game changer.”

The American Legion represents 2 million veterans nationwide. As President Donald Trump spoke Wednesday at the convention, he described the group as a “very powerful organization.”

The American Legion first acted in support of medical marijuana last summer, when it decided to put its weight behind an effort to remove marijuana from the list of Schedule I drugs to allow for more research. Schedule I drugs include heroin, LSD and Ecstasy, and are designated as having no medical use.

The group has also requested meetings with Trump with the intention to ask him to change his administration’s policy on cannabis.

In May, VA Secretary David Shulkin said he was open to new evidence showing marijuana could be used to treat veterans. But VA policy implemented in 2011 prohibits its health care providers from sharing their opinions with veterans about marijuana or recommending it for medical use.

Attempts in recent years to lift that prohibition have failed in Congress.

Last year, the “Veterans Equal Access” measure passed the House as part of a VA appropriations bill, with a vote of 233-189. It also passed the Senate on a vote of 89-9, but it was stripped out of the final legislation during negotiations to reconcile differences between the Senate and House versions.

This July, the House Rules Committee blocked the amendment from going to the House floor for debate. However, the Senate could include the measure in its VA appropriations legislation. Senators are expected to discuss the federal budget when they return in September from a monthlong recess.

“Year after year, we’ve never been able to pass the Veterans Equal Access amendment,” Sisley said Thursday. “With the full weight of the American Legion behind this next round of legislation, I know we can finally get this approved.”

During the convention on Wednesday, five American Legion members from Alabama and two from New Mexico went with Sisley to Nevada Botanical Science – a cannabis cultivation site located in an industrial park just north of Reno.

They toured three grow rooms — each holding hundreds of marijuana plants at various stages of development — and a lab where marijuana is concentrated into a substance that can be used in vaporizer pens. The veterans watched a staff member take a typical “dose” from a vaporizer pen.

Army veteran Donna Stacey, the state commander for the Alabama American Legion, said she wanted to know more because of the resolution. As a leader for her state, Stacey is expected to talk with her congressmen about the American Legion’s priorities, including medical marijuana.

Recreational use of marijuana became legal in Nevada on July 1. Alabama doesn’t permit any form of marijuana use.

“It’s hard to talk about something when you’re really clueless, when all you’re doing is reading about it,” Stacey said. “When we go to Congress and say, ‘We want you to support us to see if this has any value in treating our veterans,’ now we can say we’ve been to a facility where they’re doing some controlled growing. And it gives some added value.”

Sisley approached more than 100 veterans at the convention hall in Reno, asking that they go along on the tour. Almost all of them said no. Some veterans admitted it was because of the stigma associated with marijuana.

Stacey’s husband, Wayne — who is also an Army veteran and American Legion member — went along on the tour.

“We like to be informed. We work with veterans every day, and the more we know about what is out there, the better equipped we are to help them,” Wayne Stacey said. “The more people who are exposed and become more knowledgeable and informed, you can see some changes.”


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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