Cayman Islands Make Medical Cannabis Introduction - Michael King

The Cayman Islands Make Ground-Breaking Medical Cannabis Introduction

Article Published by: medicaljane.com

In response to mounting evidence supporting the effective use of medical cannabis to treat chronic pain, seizures, and many other health problems, and in the face of case studies revealing life changing results for patients who incorporate cannabis into their healthcare plan, the Cayman Islands are making a ground-breaking medical cannabis introduction.

Medical Cannabis Introduced in Grand Cayman

Grand Cayman’s CTMH Doctors Hospital and Cayman Pharmacy Group have introduced medical cannabis for physician-selected patients who are residents in the Cayman Islands. During this initial phase, the primary focus is to engage and educate patients, and to track their progress.

“There will be follow-up phone calls from the pharmacists themselves to closely monitor each patient. The pharmacist will also provide feedback for the physicians and together they will work towards an individually tuned treatment plan,” the hospital stated. “Professional Pharmacy will consider prescriptions for cannabis oil from all licensed prescribers. Patients are encouraged to seek medical advice on this therapy directly from their physicians.”

As with all prescriptions in the country, Professional Pharmacy provides free and confidential patient counseling on prescriptions they dispense, and this same service will be offered for cannabis treatments.

Cannabis Oil Needs to be Imported

For the time-being, cannabis oil must be imported to the islands. According to a press release, CanniMed Therapeutics Inc. will export 12,960 ml of CanniMed® oils to Caribbean Medical Distributors Ltd., located in the Cayman Islands.

CanniMed Therapeutics is a Canadian-based, international plant biopharmaceutical company with 15 years of pharmaceutical cannabis cultivation experience. In addition, CanniMed has an active plant biotechnology research and product development program focused on the production of plant-based materials for pharmaceutical, agricultural, and environmental applications.

Caribbean Medical Distributors Ltd. is working with Professional Pharmacy Services Ltd., located in the CTMH Doctors Hospital (George Town, Cayman Islands) to dispense the cannabis oil.

Cannabis-based treatments are approved for use only in the Cayman Islands and the medicine cannot legally cross international borders. For example, patients cannot carry medical cannabis into other countries, even with a prescription.

Warren Takes Cannabis Debate in Cayman to the Next Level

Dennie Warren Jr. was instrumental in persuading the current administration to take a leap from some of the world’s most oppressive laws against the use of the cannabis plant to legalizing the use of extracts under prescription. Warren is now running for office in George Town West as an independent candidate, and one of his main political platforms focuses on the need for Cayman to “grow its own.”

Warren believes Cayman could better manage the quality and availability of cannabis if it was grown on the Island, rather than being restricted by the laws of exporter countries. Though the law in Cayman was changed last November and an import certificate for cannabis oil has been approved locally, issues around exporting it from the countries that grow cannabis complicates the process.


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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Marijuana Halloween Candy Derided as Scare Tactic - Michael King

Warning of Marijuana Halloween Candy Derided as Scare Tactic

Article Published by: leafly.com

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — New Jersey is warning parents to look out for people slipping their kids marijuana-laced candy while trick-or-treating. But with no apparent evidence that’s ever happened, advocates for legalizing the drug say it’s nothing more than a Halloween scare tactic.

The state attorney general’s office published a document being shared by law enforcement agencies around New Jersey and beyond, including a warning about a “significant presence of marijuana candy and other edible forms in New Jersey and nearby states.”

“The presence of these edible forms of marijuana poses a great risk to users, especially to children, who may accidentally receive marijuana Halloween candy,” the warning said.

The warning cites the case of a 10-year-old New York boy who police said became ill after eating candy infused with cannabis found in the back seat of his family’s car, but that had nothing to do with Halloween.

Advocates say marijuana Halloween candy has seemingly become the new “razor blades in the apples” Halloween urban myth, with police around the country sharing the message despite the lack of any known cases.

“Cannabis consumers are not looking to dose children with cannabis. That is not something that I’ve ever heard of anybody ever being interested in doing or wanting to do or would think is ethical,” said Evan Nison, executive director of the New Jersey chapter of NORML, which is pushing to legalize marijuana. “This is just something that some police officers sometimes say every year, never really comes to fruition, and is just a scare tactic.”

Sharon Lauchaire, a spokeswoman for the state attorney general, said there have been “several instances” in the state and elsewhere of children becoming ill after eating edible marijuana. She declined to respond to follow-up questions to cite specific cases and evidence of anyone doing this on Halloween.

“Our job is to try to prevent accidents whenever possible, and given the striking similarities between these edible drugs and legitimate candy products, a warning was necessary and appropriate. We want our children to have a safe and happy Halloween,” she said.

Cannabis-infused candy can take the form of gummy bears or can be made to look like fruit-flavored hard candy or chocolate bars.

Al Della Fave, spokesman for the Ocean County prosecutor’s office, which shared the message this week, concedes that the likelihood of someone giving a trick-or-treater marijuana candy is “very slim.”

“But you never know,” he said. “All we’re saying is check your kids’ candy. If something’s not in a manufacturer’s wrapper … throw it out. We’re not trying to scare people.”

Nison said the idea of police being concerned about cannabis candy being wrapped to look like regular candy is another good reason to legalize and regulate it. Colorado, for instance, prohibits the packaging of edibles from having the word “candy” on it, and it bars edibles from taking the shape of humans, animals or cartoons.

The Democratic front-runner in New Jersey’s Nov. 7 governor’s race supports full marijuana legalization in the state, which could happen as soon as next year if he’s elected and the Democratic-controlled Legislature passes it. His Republican challenger opposes marijuana legalization. New Jersey already has a medical marijuana program.


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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Americans favor marijuana legalization more than ever - Michael King

Latest Gallup poll: Americans favor marijuana legalization more than ever

Article Published by: thecannabist.co

By Alicia Wallace, The Cannabist Staff

Americans’ support for marijuana legalization has reached a new high, the latest Gallup poll shows.

Gallup poll results released Wednesday found that 64 percent of adult survey respondents said they thought the use of marijuana should be made legal. It’s the highest total in Gallup’s nearly 50 years of posing the question.

It’s also the first time that a majority of Republican respondents favored legalization.

The survey of 1,028 Americans over the age of 18 also found that 51 percent of respondents with Republican political affiliation said they supported legal marijuana. That’s up from 42 percent in 2016. Although more Democrats favored legalization — up to 72 percent from 67 percent — support fell among Independents to 67 percent from 70 percent.

“The trajectory of American’s views on marijuana is similar to that of their view on same-sex marriage over the past couple of decades,” Gallup officials wrote in the release of the marijuana poll results. “On both issues, about a quarter supported legalization in the late 1990s, and today 64 percent favor each. Over the past several years, Gallup has found that Americans have become more liberal on a variety of social issues.”

When Gallup first posed the marijuana legalization question in October 1969, only 12 percent of respondents were in favor. A whopping 84 percent sat opposed.

The levels of support slowly climbed in the decades that followed, settling in at 25 percent in the 1980s and 1990s and in the mid-30 percent range during the early 2000s.

Fourteen years ago, public opinion was an inverse image of where it’s at today: 64 percent of adults surveyed opposed marijuana legalization, 34 percent said it should be legal and 2 percent had no opinion.

Public opinion has been in step with successful marijuana legalization efforts across the United States, Gallup officials said.

In late November 2012, following the states of Colorado and Washington voting to legalize the recreational use of marijuana, the Gallup marijuana poll showed support of legalization at 48 percent. That climbed to 58 percent by October 2013.

Last year — in advance of nine states voting on legalization measures, eight of which passed — Americans favored legalization at a level of 60 percent. A Quinnipiac poll released in August showed that 61 percent of those polled agreed that “the use of marijuana should be made legal in the United States.”

The Gallup poll released Wednesday was conducted Oct. 5 through 11. The margin of sampling error was plus or minus 4 percentage points.


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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How To Get Your Legal Weed Permits in California - Michael King

How To Get Your Legal Weed Permits in California

Article Published by: hightimes.com

It’s officially time to start looking into legal weed permits in California! The state is about to fully legalize recreational cannabis. If you want to break into the industry, it’s time to prepare.

The Steps For Licensing

The new year is a time for new beginnings.

In California, January 1, 2018, will mark the day when the Golden State starts the task of issuing legal weed permits in California. For those in the state who hope join the Green Rush and get in on the action, this date is everything.

If you’re planning on starting your own weed business, here’s a simplified, yet comprehensive, guide on how to start.

First Thing’s First

There are two important things to know before we start. If you’re an eager beaver and planning to apply for legal weed permits in California during the first couple of months of legality, you will only be able to get a temporary license.

This is because the state still has not finalized everything regarding regulation on their end.

And before you can obtain a statewide permit, you will need to apply for and be granted a local permit. Since both local and state permits are necessary to start and maintain cannabis businesses, you will also need to wait until your city finalizes local regulations.

The Application

You will be able to submit your application one of two ways. You can send your application through the mail if you don’t trust the Internet. Or you can apply online if you don’t trust the humans working in the mail system.

Either way, you’ll need the following four things:

1. Permission from the Government

This should be obvious, but unless you can show proof that you’re authorized to open a cannabis business, you won’t be able to move forward with your application for legal weed permits in California.

2. Business Information

You don’t need to present a detailed business plan.

For this component, you pretty much just need the basics of your business. Useful and required information includes the name of the business, relevant contact information and a brief summary of what your business will be.

And speaking of what kind of business you’re planning on having…

3. Your Desired Type and Class of License

You’ll need to officially decide upon what avenue you’re traveling on in terms of business.

In other words, pick a side: medical cannabis or recreational cannabis.

From there, you will need to specify what kind of business you will be running. Some options for this include retailer, testing lab and distributer, among others.

4. A Basic Floor Plan

This doesn’t have to be too detailed. The people reviewing your application just want to know the layout of the rooms and divisions of your business.

When you submit an application for a permanent license, though, you’ll need to provide more details, like what kind of security measures you will have.

Final Hit: How To Get Your Legal Weed Permits in California

None of this sounds too daunting, right?

Compared to the college application process, this seems like a walk in the park. Hey, no one’s asking you to write an essay explaining why you’re special and different from the millions of other students vying for a spot!

Again, keep in mind that this is a simplified and streamlined guide to legal weed permits in California. For more detailed information, visit the official website of the state’s Bureau of Cannabis Control. Good luck, everybody!


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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American Legion adopts resolution for medical marijuana - Michael King

American Legion adopts resolution supporting medical marijuana

Article Published by: stripes.com

RENO, Nev. – The American Legion adopted a resolution Thursday urging the federal government to allow Department of Veterans Affairs doctors to discuss and recommend medical marijuana in states where it’s legal, adding to the group’s efforts to get cannabis in the hands of veterans it could help.

The resolution, passed at the group’s national convention in Reno, Nevada, was authored by American Legion member Rob Ryan of Blue Ash, Ohio. According to the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Ohio has the fourth highest rate of overdose deaths in the nation, behind West Virginia, New Hampshire and Kentucky. It’s also one of the 29 states that permit some form of cannabis use. Ryan said he’s heard from veterans “over and over and over again” who use marijuana as an alternative to addictive opioids.

“Our state congressmen, when the American Legion says something, they listen. Hopefully, this will have the same impact at the federal level,” Ryan said. “People should not be afraid to go to their doctors and talk honestly.”

Ryan shepherded the resolution through his local American Legion post, and then took it to the county, district and state level before it was discussed in Reno this week. Sue Sisley, a psychiatrist studying marijuana’s effects on veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder, called it a “game changer.”

The American Legion represents 2 million veterans nationwide. As President Donald Trump spoke Wednesday at the convention, he described the group as a “very powerful organization.”

The American Legion first acted in support of medical marijuana last summer, when it decided to put its weight behind an effort to remove marijuana from the list of Schedule I drugs to allow for more research. Schedule I drugs include heroin, LSD and Ecstasy, and are designated as having no medical use.

The group has also requested meetings with Trump with the intention to ask him to change his administration’s policy on cannabis.

In May, VA Secretary David Shulkin said he was open to new evidence showing marijuana could be used to treat veterans. But VA policy implemented in 2011 prohibits its health care providers from sharing their opinions with veterans about marijuana or recommending it for medical use.

Attempts in recent years to lift that prohibition have failed in Congress.

Last year, the “Veterans Equal Access” measure passed the House as part of a VA appropriations bill, with a vote of 233-189. It also passed the Senate on a vote of 89-9, but it was stripped out of the final legislation during negotiations to reconcile differences between the Senate and House versions.

This July, the House Rules Committee blocked the amendment from going to the House floor for debate. However, the Senate could include the measure in its VA appropriations legislation. Senators are expected to discuss the federal budget when they return in September from a monthlong recess.

“Year after year, we’ve never been able to pass the Veterans Equal Access amendment,” Sisley said Thursday. “With the full weight of the American Legion behind this next round of legislation, I know we can finally get this approved.”

During the convention on Wednesday, five American Legion members from Alabama and two from New Mexico went with Sisley to Nevada Botanical Science – a cannabis cultivation site located in an industrial park just north of Reno.

They toured three grow rooms — each holding hundreds of marijuana plants at various stages of development — and a lab where marijuana is concentrated into a substance that can be used in vaporizer pens. The veterans watched a staff member take a typical “dose” from a vaporizer pen.

Army veteran Donna Stacey, the state commander for the Alabama American Legion, said she wanted to know more because of the resolution. As a leader for her state, Stacey is expected to talk with her congressmen about the American Legion’s priorities, including medical marijuana.

Recreational use of marijuana became legal in Nevada on July 1. Alabama doesn’t permit any form of marijuana use.

“It’s hard to talk about something when you’re really clueless, when all you’re doing is reading about it,” Stacey said. “When we go to Congress and say, ‘We want you to support us to see if this has any value in treating our veterans,’ now we can say we’ve been to a facility where they’re doing some controlled growing. And it gives some added value.”

Sisley approached more than 100 veterans at the convention hall in Reno, asking that they go along on the tour. Almost all of them said no. Some veterans admitted it was because of the stigma associated with marijuana.

Stacey’s husband, Wayne — who is also an Army veteran and American Legion member — went along on the tour.

“We like to be informed. We work with veterans every day, and the more we know about what is out there, the better equipped we are to help them,” Wayne Stacey said. “The more people who are exposed and become more knowledgeable and informed, you can see some changes.”


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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Cannabinoids: Dermatological Skin Care and Anti-aging - Michael King

Cannabinoids: the Next Generation of Dermatological Skin Care and Anti-aging

Article Published by: directcannabisnetwork.com

The studies of the effects of THC and CBD continue to shed light on its many beneficial health properties, and one such industry to start dipping its toes into cannabis is beauty, dermatology and skin care.

The medical marijuana business in the United States is worth some $2 billion annually, whereas the skin care segment in the beauty industry is worth $11 billion in the U.S. alone (globally it’s a $120 billion industry). Could we say that this might be yet another incredible opportunity to do business and help people with cannabis? Let’s weigh it out…

When it comes to skin care, many people do not realize that marijuana is a viable ingredient. The two most popular types of cannabis you will see in skin care is hemp seed oil and CBD. Hemp skin care products have been available commercially for some time now, but it’s typically marketed for the body as cleansers or moisturizers. With strong antioxidant and antibacterial properties, Cannabidiol is the ingredient that is going to make the difference in skin care with important health benefits.

Cannabidiol is proven to reduce inflammation of the skin, and inflammation is the number one cause of premature aging from the inside out. While some inflammation is healthy and necessary to protect the body against infection and repair it when injured, chronic inflammation causes more harm than good. Chronically inflamed skin can lead to rosacea, some types of acne and premature aging including fine lines, wrinkles, and psoriasis. Cannabidiol has anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties that naturally helps improve irritating skin conditions such as acne, rosacea, eczema, and psoriasis.

CBD topicals may also remedy the effects of aging and repair genetic damage at the cellular level because it is jam-packed with even more antioxidants than vitamins E, C and A. Further validating the therapeutic relevance of cannabinoid treatment, cannabis topicals containing both THC and CBD have been proven to decrease melanoma cell survival. While at first glance joining marijuana and skin care may seem like a stretch, cannabinoid infused topicals can actually do the skin and body a world of good.

Could cannabidiol someday be touted as the new super beauty ingredient? Will it become a huge breakthrough in skin care harnessed in topical lotions, creams, oils, and tinctures? The powerful, natural healing components of cannabis oil trend toward yes.


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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Marijuana Dispensary Openings Decline in Opioid Abuse - Michael King

Study: Marijuana Dispensaries Associated With Declining Rates Of Painkiller Abuse

Article Published by: norml.org

Athens, GA: Cannabis dispensaries are associated with reduced levels of opioid-related treatment admissions and overall drug mortality, according to a study published online on SSRN.com.

A University of Georgia economics professor assessed the relationship between the opening of medical cannabis dispensaries and drug treatment admissions.

Marijuana Dispensary openings are associated with “a 20 percentage point relative decrease in painkiller treatment over the first two-years of dispensary operations,” the study reported. This correlation was strongest among non-Hispanic white males in their thirties.

Marijuana Dispensary openings also resulted in fewer drug-related mortalities per 100,000 people.

The author concludes, “[T]he unintended beneficial effects of allowing for marijuana dispensary operations should be considered by policymakers as they aim to curtail narcotic abuse and limit the impact of the opioid epidemic.”

The paper’s findings are similar to prior studies reporting that states permitting medical marijuana dispensaries experience a relative decrease in both opioid abuse and opioid overdose deaths compared to states that do not.

For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “The effect of medical marijuana dispensaries on adverse opioid outcomes,” appears online.


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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Marijuana Justice Act legalizes marijuana the right way - Michael King

Why the Marijuana Justice Act legalizes marijuana the right way

Article Published by: thehill.com

Earlier this month, Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) introduced the Marijuana Justice Act. To some, this bill may look like another liberal attempt to push for widespread legalization of marijuana across the country. But for those of us who work in this industry and understand the complexities and inequities of current marijuana policies, the bill is a bold step forward in transforming the industry as we know it.

I recommend that anyone who questions why marijuana should no longer be illegal under federal law, take the time to watch Sen. Booker’s three-minute video explaining his legislation. It will shine a light on how marijuana policies have negatively impacted targeted communities, specifically low-income communities of color. The Marijuana Justice Act seeks to undo some of the damage that Booker aptly describes as, “the unjust application of the law and economic bias.” For example, the bill would expunge convictions for those with marijuana use and/or possession charges at the federal level which, in turn, will allow for greater access to education and economic opportunities.

As CEO of a company which works in the legal marijuana industry, it is a priority for me that this industry gives everyone a fair and equal playing field. On a daily basis, I meet and speak with entrepreneurs and investors who are interested in becoming a part of the marijuana industry because of its huge growth potential and opportunity.

However, with opportunity come risks, and in this industry we take financial, legal and professional risks. That said, there is a large segment of the population that is not at the table for these types of discussions because they were previously targeted during the war on drugs and now cannot fully participate in the state legal boom of this business.

For them, the risks are still too high under marijuana’s current federal classification as a Schedule I drug. The Marijuana Justice Act seeks to change this by taking steps to fix the system so that marijuana is not just legal, but that the industry as a whole can move forward in a direction that we can be proud of.

Additionally, this legislation is important because it would also address a number of challenges marijuana businesses face such as lack of access to ordinary banking services. It would also move towards regulating the marijuana market as a whole and by regulating legal access, it would discourage and replace illicit drug activity.

I applaud Booker for introducing thoughtful legislation that would legalize the industry in the “right” way and that truly has the ability to move the ball forward on some of the historically negative aspects of this industry. Now is the time for the federal government to acknowledge that marijuana should be legal and removed from the list of controlled substances.

A recent CBS News poll showed that 71 percent of Americans oppose the federal government’s efforts to stop marijuana sales and use in states that have legalized it, and 61 percent of Americans want marijuana legal across the country. Additionally, in the first six months of this new Congress, over a dozen bi-partisan bills have been introduced aimed at moving marijuana policies and regulations forward. Like Booker’s legislation, these bills acknowledge that updated marijuana laws and policies will bring a plethora of economic and social benefits to our country through increased job opportunities and tax revenues.

Congress must acknowledge the position of the majority of the American public and respond accordingly. I call on lawmakers to support the Marijuana Justice Act and will be doing my part to raise this bill as a priority in the technology, transportation, policy and marijuana business communities eaze is a part of.

Jim Patterson is the CEO of eaze, a cannabis technology that connects people to doctors and dispensaries for on-demand consultations and deliveries.


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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“Active” Mormons Support Medical Marijuana - Michael King

Majority of Utah’s “Active” Mormons Support Medical Marijuana

Article Published by: marijuana.com 

Apparently, Jon Huntsman Sr. is not alone in his devout beliefs or his support of medical marijuana. According to a new poll, a majority of Utah’s “active” members of the Mormon church are joining Huntsman in his support of the medicinal herb.

Organized by UtahPolicy.com and tallied by Dan Jones & Associates, the survey was conducted from Aug. 30 to Sept. 5, 2017, and queried 608 registered voters.

The results from the poll showed 63 percent of Utah’s “active” members of the Mormon church support medical marijuana.

Even a majority of voters who consider themselves “very conservative” support the legalization of medical marijuana in Utah.

Historically resistant to all things cannabis, leaders of the Mormon faith have systematically fought any attempt to legalize medical marijuana in Utah over the past several years. On course for a philosophical showdown in 2018, the church has opposed an initiative to legalize medical marijuana that is now gathering signatures to qualify for the November 2018 ballot.

Utah Medical Marijuana Support by the Numbers

*Utah Republican Support for 2018 Medical Marijuana Initiative: 61-35%
*Utah Democrats Support for 2018 Medical Marijuana Initiative: 93-7%
*Utah Independents Support for 2018 Medical Marijuana Initiative: 87-13%
*“Very Active” Mormons Support for 2018 Medical Marijuana Initiative: 63%
*“Somewhat Active” Mormons Support for 2018 Medical Marijuana Initiative: 80-20%
*“Very Conservative” Support for 2018 Medical Marijuana Initiative: 51-42%
*“Somewhat Conservative” Support for 2018 Medical Marijuana Initiative: 71-25%
*“Moderates” Support for 2018 Medical Marijuana Initiative: 84-14%
*“Somewhat Liberal” Support for 2018 Medical Marijuana Initiative: 92-8%
*“Very Liberal” Support for 2018 Medical Marijuana Initiative: 97-2%

Rejecting the overtly “cautious approach” advised by Utah’s Mormon leaders, the overwhelming majority of Utahns support the 2018 marijuana initiative.

As summarized by the Utah Patients Coalition, the 2018 initiative would create a system of medical marijuana dispensaries similar to pharmacies but dedicated to the distribution of marijuana’s medicinal cannabinoids in a smokeless form. If passed, the petition would maintain prohibitions against home cultivation (until 2021), and prohibit any public smoking or driving under the influence of medical marijuana. After Jan. 1, 2021, Utah’s patients living more than 100 miles from a dispensary would be allowed to cultivate cannabis, provided certain conditions are met.

In the below YouTube video, Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT), a devout Mormon, introduced new legislation that seeks to improve and streamline the process for conducting scientific research on marijuana.


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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Assurances From Cannabis Control Commission - Michael King

Marijuana Legalization Advocates Seek Assurances From Cannabis Control Commission Members Who Voted Against Question 4

Article Published by: mpp.org

Advocates are also calling on Cannabis Control Commission (CCC) chairman to request sufficient funding from governor and Legislature

BOSTON — The Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), the group behind the marijuana legalization measure passed by voters last November, said today that the newly appointed Cannabis Control Commission (CCC) members who opposed Question 4 should make clear that their personal positions will not impact their board responsibilities or cause further delays in implementing the law.

The group also called for the CCC Chairman, Steven Hoffman, to request that the governor and the Legislature provide adequate funding to get the legal sales system up and running on the current schedule.

“A strong majority of Massachusetts voters passed Question 4 last November. Since then, we’ve seen a six-month delay, a deeply flawed legislative rewrite process, blown deadlines, and now a five-person regulatory board stacked with four legalization opponents. These developments in no way instill confidence that the implementation of legal marijuana sales will be any better than the state’s dreadful medical marijuana rollout,” said Jim Borghesani, Massachusetts spokesman for MPP and former communications director for the Yes on 4 Campaign.

Borghesani called for the four anti-legalization commissioners to publicly commit to adhering to the current timeline for implementation, which would allow retail sales to adults to begin on July 1, 2018.

“We want assurances, and we think the voters deserve assurances. There is too much at stake to simply sit back and hope for the best. We want to see solid commitments to advancing the will of the voters,” Borghesani said.

Matthew Schweich, Director of State Campaigns for MPP and former campaign director for the Yes on 4 Campaign, called upon CCC Chairman Steven Hoffman to request from the governor and the Legislature the level of funding necessary to implement the law without any further delays.

“Supporters of legalization, which include a majority of Massachusetts voters, have cause for concern. By a significant margin, the individuals responsible for implementing this public policy opposed its creation less than a year ago. If the Cannabis Control Commission is truly committed to upholding the will of the people without any further delays, then Chairman Hoffman will publicly request the funding necessary to allow legal sales of marijuana to begin on July 1, 2018,” said Schweich.

State Treasurer Deb Goldberg earlier this year proposed a first-year CCC budget of $10 million. However, the current budget includes just $1.2 million for the CCC.

“The legalization policy will soon be generating millions of dollars in tax revenue for the Commonwealth, but that can only happen if the Legislature provides the funds to establish the program and regulations, and that will only happen if the Cannabis Control Commission is committed to meeting its deadlines,” Schweich said.

Massachusetts’ track record on medical marijuana — with only 12 dispensaries open five years after voters approved the medical measure — justifies concerns about the adult-use rollout, Borghesani added.

“We heard time and time again that state officials wanted to ‘get this right,’ which is precisely what they said about medical marijuana. We need to be assured that this rollout is not going to be a repeat of the medical marijuana debacle,” said Borghesani.


About Michael King

Michael King is an experienced professional with a background in finance, private equity, real estate and consulting. He is currently a principal in one of the leading Cannabis consulting firms in the country — Duard Ventures.

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